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Matt123
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Best Veeam Implementation?

Post by Matt123 » Jul 26, 2013 10:08 am

Hello hello!

I have a 3 host Vmware Enviroment with an nearly full 3TB SAN and plan to use Veeam to backup local and remotely.
I have the following suggestion on how I will go about doing this and would like input to 'better' ways that it can be implemented.

To have a new physical server with Veeam installed on it, some budget HP Server with local disks raid protected.
Then I would have a QNAP with raid protected storage sat in a data centre. I could then use the local veeam server to backup over to a WAN share (of some sort?) on our QNAP in the datacenter.

Would i require veeam (at the other end?)

I am looking for the best implementation of our backup/restore process.
I want to keep as much data as possible for the best price.

I also want the data in a local data center so i can go drive pick it up for a fast restoration process.

I look forward to your comments and recommendations if CPU/Memory/Disk will help the backup fast.

:o

foggy
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Re: Best Veeam Implementation?

Post by foggy » Jul 26, 2013 10:37 am

Matt, have you heard about the new Backup Copy job type available in the soon-to-be-released Veeam B&R v7? Seems to perfectly address your requirements.

Matt123
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Re: Best Veeam Implementation?

Post by Matt123 » Jul 26, 2013 10:56 am

Would this backup to local repo and then to remote location after, this way saves pulling from the source twice?

Do you have a link to info on this feature?

This was I wouldn't require 'server like' features at my remote location just pure disk space?

foggy
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Re: Best Veeam Implementation?

Post by foggy » Jul 26, 2013 11:04 am

Matt123 wrote:Would this backup to local repo and then to remote location after, this way saves pulling from the source twice?
You would have an ordinary backup job to perform backup to the local repository first, then the Backup Copy job will offload the required restore points offsite. Production VMs will be touched only once, during the first local backup.
Matt123 wrote:Do you have a link to info on this feature?
I've provided two of them in my previous post actually. ;)
Matt123 wrote:This was I wouldn't require 'server like' features at my remote location just pure disk space?
Not sure I understand what do you mean here. You will need to have the backup repository server at your remote location.

yizhar
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Re: Best Veeam Implementation?

Post by yizhar » Jul 26, 2013 12:40 pm

Matt123 wrote: To have a new physical server with Veeam installed on it, some budget HP Server with local disks raid protected.
Good.
Make sure you have enough capacity - I recommend at least 5tb, and a fast controller.
For example make sure you have RAID5 controller with BBWC, instead of low end on-board sata.
Disks can be for example 6*2tb SATA.
Matt123 wrote: Then I would have a QNAP with raid protected storage sat in a data centre. I could then use the local veeam server to backup over to a WAN share (of some sort?) on our QNAP in the datacenter.
Not good.
You will need an additional server to act as remote proxy/repository.
A better approach is to have another windows server at remote location.
Matt123 wrote: Would i require veeam (at the other end?)
No, but you will need a Windows server to act as remote proxy and repository.

f.dapra@ifinet.it
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Re: Best Veeam Implementation?

Post by f.dapra@ifinet.it » Jul 26, 2013 3:37 pm

If you can afford buy a Server as the backup server/repository the two important factor as other have said is having a hardware controller and a sufficient number of disks to handle the throuput.
The majority of the low budget NAS (I mean under 4k €) are not powerful enought to get the max performances, those would struggle with reverse incremental.

We got very good results with IBM x3630 M4 with 3 or 4 TB SATA disks and you can get up to 56 TB in a 2U machine.
Dell and HP have similar solutions.
jmtc

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