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mustang
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Failover scenario

Post by mustang » Jul 08, 2012 4:02 pm

I have 2 ESX servers, server A and Server B

Server A is a failover server and running a VM with Veeam Running
Server B is the production server with a import VM running that is beeing replicated to server A

Yesterday i had a outtage that destroyed my server B. Therefor lost my important VM and did a fail over move with the "Failover now" action. Veeam activated the replica on Server A and business went back to normal.
I have now repaired Server B. But had to reinstall ESX and no VM data is left.

At this point i want to move the important VM back to server B, except there is nothing left on server B. What is the recommend scenario in this

- Replicate important VM A -> B
- Deactivate important VM on server A
- Activate important VM on server B
- Start replicating important VM B -> A

Vitaliy S.
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Re: Failover scenario

Post by Vitaliy S. » Jul 08, 2012 7:51 pm

Your scenario looks good to me.

tsightler
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Re: Failover scenario

Post by tsightler » Jul 08, 2012 11:31 pm 1 person likes this post

You can certainly perform the steps manually, however, assuming you have rebuilt the server and Veeam and see it you can also choose to use the "Failback Wizard" and it will handle all of the steps automatically. The procedure is as follows:

1. Right click on the active replica and select "Failback to production"
2. In the wizard select the VM to failback and click Next
3. In the following screen select "Failback to the specified location (advanced)". This option will allow you to pick a new ESX host, storage, etc., even if the original VM no longer exist.
4. Continue through the wizard to select the new ESX host, datastore, network, etc.
5. Once complete click next and Veeam will automatically create the VM, replicate the now running replica back to the source, and finally power off the replica, replicate the final changes, and, if you choose, automatically power on the VM at the new location.
6. At that point you can choose to "commit" the failback, which will update the replication job with the "new" source VM, and allow you to continue replication as originally.

This pretty much makes the entire failback automated, even if the original VM is completely missing. The biggest disadvantage to this approach is that you can't choose the exact time to perform the actual failback. If it takes an hour to perform the initial failback replication, Veeam will then immediately power off the VM and replicate the final changes. If you manually perform these steps you have more control over exactly when you want the actual failback to take place.

mustang
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Re: Failover scenario

Post by mustang » Jul 09, 2012 7:26 am

Thanks,
that was indeed what i looked for. Im using now the "Faillback to production"

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