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jbrullemans
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How to does Veeam measure the network load

Post by jbrullemans »

Ik have several jobs running with Veeam v6 in this version you acn see what the "bottleneks" are most of my bottleneks are network related. But if i check my network load under taskmanager i only see 10% -20% load maximal. Most of the time i see no network load. i find this a little strange.

tsightler
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Re: How to does Veeam measure the network load

Post by tsightler »

This answer is generally well covered in the FAQ.

Veeam is not attempting to measure the usage of your bandwidth, it is measuring the amount of time spent "waiting" on the network stack. Many things can affect this performance, perhaps not having optimal network drivers, a slow or loaded link between source and target, or, if the proxy and target are the same system, this sometimes refers to the speed of the local disk.

jbrullemans
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Re: How to does Veeam measure the network load

Post by jbrullemans »

Oops. Forgot to read it :oops: . Are there any network tweaks for it besides switching with compression en target.

Gostev
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Re: How to does Veeam measure the network load

Post by Gostev »

Task Manager is really not a good monitoring tool as it provides "tunnel vision". It will show you traffic this specific server is responsible for, but it will not tell you that the network is overwhelmed with data sent from other servers. You should instead monitor real network usage on routers/switches.

One other thing to keep in mind - depending on your job configuration - for example, backup direct to CIFS share, or replication with source and target proxy being the same - network will be shown as the bottleneck, whereas the real bottleneck might be the write speed to your target (which our bottleneck analysis simply has no visibility into, because of no "target" agent present in these cases).

As far as network tweaks, they are only needed if you want to get as close as possible to the wire speed. You should be able to see 50-70 MB/s without any tweaks really (on empty network). However, if you want to go up - enabling jumbo frames would be the first step (just remember to do this on every NIC and router/switch on that network, or things will get really sad). Then, there are also Windows TCP/IP stack tweaks that you can apply (these are covered under Direct SAN Access section of VMware FAQ, since they are primarily used by our customers for pushing iSCSI SAN data retrieval speed to the limit).

Hope this helps.

Daveyd
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Re: How to does Veeam measure the network load

Post by Daveyd »

125MB/sec is 1Gb/s wire speed. So getting 70-80MB/s on a switched network isn't too bad. I average 60-70MB/s on my full backups with a 1Gb link to our Exagrid appliance.

On my home network with a cheap Dlink gigabit switch, I average around 110MB/s from my PC to my server transferring large files. Of course I don't have 100s of workstations on my network either :)

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